The dangers of capacity assessment shopping

I’d like to talk about what happens when you’ve got a capacity assessment that doesn’t match up with the frontline professionals’ views. This has come up for me, most recently, in the context of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards but it can come up in other contexts too. I’d also like to reflect on whatContinue reading “The dangers of capacity assessment shopping”

Coronavirus lockdown: do all planned visits to family homes have to stop?

The answer, in short is, in my opinion, no. However, there are a number of issues to consider before a weekend with the family, or some formal respite, is supported. In this post, I’ll talk about 3 big issues, 2 legal, 1 practical. But before we get started, I just want to detail the kindContinue reading “Coronavirus lockdown: do all planned visits to family homes have to stop?”

Visiting in care homes

This continues to be a hot topic, understandably. And pressure seems to be mounting, with an overdue policy shift towards enabling visits beginning to develop. And rightly so. A ban for a few weeks was one thing, but it’s been months now, and there is no real end in sight. So this post will talkContinue reading “Visiting in care homes”

Winter is coming – a brief word on the adult social care winter plan

There is so much guidance coming out at the moment that it is almost impossible to keep on top of it. I’m not even going to try to comment on every bit of it as it comes up. And I’ve already read Alex Ruck-Keane’s walk-through of the latest MCA guidance, I’m sure most of youContinue reading “Winter is coming – a brief word on the adult social care winter plan”

Human rights and the Coronavirus Act 2020

If you haven’t seen it yet, the Joint Committee on Human Rights has published a report exploring the human rights implications of the Coronavirus Act 2020 and its available here. It makes for interesting reading, and if you are the kind of nerd I am, then I do encourage you to read it. If not,Continue reading “Human rights and the Coronavirus Act 2020”

Revised MCA covid-19 guidance published

Last week, the government published its updated guidance on application on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards during the pandemic. I read this over the weekend (no, I don’t have anything better to do!). If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s here. It doesn’t look to me like a huge amountContinue reading “Revised MCA covid-19 guidance published”

Social care and health care joint working arrangements – what can go wrong

This post discusses a case example from my practice, suitably anonymised, where the local authority and NHS Clinical Commissioning Group should be working together to support a hospital discharge for an incapacitated adult, but that, to date, hasn’t quite worked out. Safety warning: I do work for the local authority here, so I’ll try toContinue reading “Social care and health care joint working arrangements – what can go wrong”

Spot the difference: The need for precision in capacity assessments

I wrote previously about the importance of evidence and not making assumptions here. It’s something I have been thinking about again, in the context of some work I was involved with over the last few weeks. Because I was involved with 2 cases with very different facts, but raising a central issue around assessing capacityContinue reading “Spot the difference: The need for precision in capacity assessments”

When everything hinges on a capacity assessment

I want to talk to you today about an issue that I am coming up against more and more at the moment in my day to day practice. Let’s refer to it as the ‘unco-operative patient’ issue. I am finding this to be a particular issue in personality disorder cases, where mental illness and personalityContinue reading “When everything hinges on a capacity assessment”

Let’s talk about court processes: part 4 – concluding proceedings

The, rather delayed, final post in my series on Court of Protection processes looking at the conclusion of proceedings.