An urgent move during Court of Protection proceedings: a how (not) to guide

It is inevitable that sometimes in Court of Protection proceedings, there will be times when a move needs to take place urgently. There are any number of reasons why this might happen: arrangements in the community breakdown, safeguarding issues happen, risks increase and sometimes, a really good placement comes up which will be lost toContinue reading “An urgent move during Court of Protection proceedings: a how (not) to guide”

How the court decides on best interests: is that really that important though?

This is the third post in my series about how the Court of Protection makes best interests decisions. In practice, it’s a messy process, but I have broken it down into stages to make it easier to understand. Or that’s my intention anyway. If I’m only confusing you further, I do apologise! So we startedContinue reading “How the court decides on best interests: is that really that important though?”

Round table meetings: what to expect

Today I am going to talk about round table meetings during Court of Protection proceedings. Or RTMs as they are commonly referred to. They are a very valuable part of the process, but when invitations go out, I do get people calling me up to ask about what the meeting is for, and what they’llContinue reading “Round table meetings: what to expect”

How the court decides on best interests: part 2 What about this?

In part 1 of this series we looked at how to identify the available options, by talking about P and his future residence and care. The court is satisfied that there are currently 3 available options, Blue Care Home, Yellow Cottage supported living and Q’s house (his sister) with care from Pink Care Agency. SoContinue reading “How the court decides on best interests: part 2 What about this?”

How the court decides best interests: part 1 What are my options?

I wanted to offer some practical insights on how the Court of Protection makes decisions about what is in a person’s (always referred to as P) best interests. Because it sounds simple, but it isn’t. And I’ve spoken to so many professionals and family members who are so clear that they are advocating for P’sContinue reading “How the court decides best interests: part 1 What are my options?”

When lawyers really just need to do better

I have picked up a case recently in the Court of Protection, representing a family member of P. It is interesting, and when I say interesting you can read frustrating, time-consuming and way more complicated that it needs to be. The difficulty has nothing to do with P, and a lot to do with P’sContinue reading “When lawyers really just need to do better”

Reflections on my first in person client visit

I am aware that most of you reading this will be social care practitioners in one capacity or the other, so you will probably read this and chuckle. But I imagine how I felt during my first client visit is a lot like how non-lawyers feel the first time they are asked to come toContinue reading “Reflections on my first in person client visit”

I’ve been notified about s21A proceedings, what do I do?

This is a question I get asked a lot, so I will try to talk you through the process as well as I can, both for professionals and family members. If you don’t know what s21A proceedings are, don’t worry, not many people do. They are very specialised proceedings in the Court of Protection broughtContinue reading “I’ve been notified about s21A proceedings, what do I do?”

Care Act assessment: part 4 the write-up

This is the final post in my series about Care Act needs assessments. So far we have looked at the actions to be taken at first contact with an individual, the eligibility criteria and the need for the process to be person-centred, appropriate and proportionate. This last post will explore one of my favourite topics:Continue reading “Care Act assessment: part 4 the write-up”

The inherent jurisdiction of the High Court: the regular red herring

I covered the basics of what the inherent jurisdiction is about in my previous post here. What this post will discuss is the reasons why it doesn’t provide a solution in the vast majority of cases. The first issue that presents is obtaining sufficient evidence to make a case to begin with. The type ofContinue reading “The inherent jurisdiction of the High Court: the regular red herring”