Keep calm and carry on: when a solicitor wants to attend a meeting

It has become increasingly apparent to me since I moved out of local authority that my presence is considered somehow intimidating. Quite why professionals find little, smiley 5’1″ me so scary is not entirely clear (especially as I am fully power-dressed right now in a Lion King hoodie and jeans), but it has riled meContinue reading “Keep calm and carry on: when a solicitor wants to attend a meeting”

Bearing a burden that isn’t yours to carry

The purpose of this blog is primarily to provide insights into the legal concepts and processes at play within adult social care. I am aware that most of you are here for that information. But I also believe in looking at concepts in context, and some of that context is personal. Burn out, compassion fatigueContinue reading “Bearing a burden that isn’t yours to carry”

What it’s like to work as an in house local authority lawyer: what I didn’t like

This is not a bitter confessional from a disgruntled employee, but it is only fair to acknowledge some of the challenges of working in local authority as an adult social care lawyer. I don’t work there anymore, so if I couldn’t give some negatives, you’d just assume I was lying! I spoke in my earlierContinue reading “What it’s like to work as an in house local authority lawyer: what I didn’t like”

What its like to work as an in house local authority lawyer: what I loved

For many, New Year is a time for reflection and 2021 has certainly been an eventful year. As regular readers of this blog will know, 2021 is also the year I left local authority and took a private practice role. It’s been nearly 6 months since then and I am (probation period dependant) settling intoContinue reading “What its like to work as an in house local authority lawyer: what I loved”

Tips for statement writing: What lawyers really think when they read a statement

I am going to talk today about witness statements, but a lot of these principles will apply to any formal report that is used to evidence reasoning such as assessments for Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, social circumstances reports etc. This is largely aimed at social care professionals, because family members and other ‘lay people’ willContinue reading “Tips for statement writing: What lawyers really think when they read a statement”

When lawyers really just need to do better

I have picked up a case recently in the Court of Protection, representing a family member of P. It is interesting, and when I say interesting you can read frustrating, time-consuming and way more complicated that it needs to be. The difficulty has nothing to do with P, and a lot to do with P’sContinue reading “When lawyers really just need to do better”

Reflections on my first in person client visit

I am aware that most of you reading this will be social care practitioners in one capacity or the other, so you will probably read this and chuckle. But I imagine how I felt during my first client visit is a lot like how non-lawyers feel the first time they are asked to come toContinue reading “Reflections on my first in person client visit”

The sad result of gaps in services

I would like, if you all don’t mind indulging me, to reflect on the often present problem of gaps in services. This is an issue, which I think has the potential to become more profound as services continue to be stretched and the country begins to feel the long-term effects of the last few difficultContinue reading “The sad result of gaps in services”

The inherent jurisdiction of the High Court: the regular red herring

I covered the basics of what the inherent jurisdiction is about in my previous post here. What this post will discuss is the reasons why it doesn’t provide a solution in the vast majority of cases. The first issue that presents is obtaining sufficient evidence to make a case to begin with. The type ofContinue reading “The inherent jurisdiction of the High Court: the regular red herring”

Putting emotion to the side, and the personal price of impartial legal advice

When I was at university, I was trained to put emotion to the side. It weaves through all the work we do, particularly around professional conduct. After all, lawyers can be asked to undertake any number of tasks they find morally or emotionally objectionable. Lawyers defend child molesters; they support parents that may seem unfitContinue reading “Putting emotion to the side, and the personal price of impartial legal advice”